The Extraordinary Benefits of Cold Showers

Water therapy has been around for centuries, but we rarely hear much about it since Big Pharma firms have no interest in inexpensive water cures.

Throughout history, unless there was access to a hot spring, humans have largely been limited to bathing in cold water. Access to abundant hot water is a modern luxury, but as we’ll see, a luxury that is not without its price.

In ancient times cold water was the only choice available to most people when bathing. Interestingly though, even when the Ancient Greeks developed heating systems for their public baths, they continued bathing in cold water for the proven health benefits. The always tough Spartans felt hot water was for the weak and cowardly and only used cold water because they believed it tempered the body and made it vigorous for fighting.

I’m a black belt in Taekwondo and know that the importance of cold showers is even included in the Taekwondo Moral Code where it advocates, “By taking cold shower and baths or exercising on snow-covered ground in bare feet, students build tenacity and pride.” Simply hopping in a cold shower is perhaps the easiest and most overlooked way to build courage and will power that will make conquering life’s tasks easier.

Today, much of the knowledge of cold water benefits has gone by the wayside as we enjoy the delights of our modern luxuries. Our ancestors were exposed to a wide range of fluctuating ambient temperatures and swam and bathed in cold water. Modern man, however, often lives in a fairly consistent room temperature. Some scientists propose that this lack of thermal stress is one factor that contributes to depression.

So if ancient man didn’t clean himself with sustained periods of temperature controlled hot water, then maybe we shouldn’t either. Cold showers are a proven ancient technique that effectively promotes overall radiant health.

This article will explain why moderately cool or room temperature showers are much healthier than hot showers, and then we’ll get into the extraordinary benefits of cold showers. First, let’s begin with why hot showers are downright harmful.

The Health Risks of a Hot Shower

It may sound like a paranoid concern, but experts unanimously agree that hot showers vaporize dangerous amounts of chlorine, fluoride, and other toxic chemicals into the air. One professor of Water Chemistry says, “I tell my friends to take quick, cold showers. The longer and hotter the shower, the more chemicals build up in the air.”

The heat and the dispersion of water in a hot shower vaporize carcinogens into the air allowing the evaporated chemicals to be inhaled. They can also spread through the house and be inhaled by others. Hot showers also open up the pores of the skin allowing even more toxic chemicals to enter our body (absorbed) through our skin than would occur even from drinking the water!

Cool water keeps the pores of your skin more or less closed during the shower so you don’t absorb as much of the chemicals in the water or the scary chemicals in today’s soaps and shampoos.

Exposure to the toxic chemicals contained in our water supplies is greatly reduced in a cool shower as less steam is made and therefore less chlorine inhaled into the lungs or absorbed through the skin. Cold showers not only offer their own benefits, but help shield you from the deleterious effects of hot showers.

Better Looking Skin

When you shower with warm water, it opens up your pores. Then you wash and this cleans up your pores. This can be good, but it’s critical to close your pores again with cold water. This will prevent the pores from being easily clogged by dirt and oil, which causes skin imperfections such as acne for example.

Hot showers dry out the skin by stripping it of its natural oils. When the pores open up from the heat, the skin’s oils are completely vulnerable to being eroded away by the water. Dry skin can be itchy, become chapped or cracked, and exasperate conditions like eczema. When the normally plump cells of moist skin become dry and shriveled, fine lines and wrinkles also appear. A cold shower keeps the pores tightly closed, keeping the oils locked in.

When the natural oils from your skin are washed away your body will often compensate by either producing more oil or not enough. The oil made by your body will always be better than any topical moisturizer you can buy. The oil made by your body is not dirty unless your diet and environment is.

Cool water appropriately flushes toxins from the skin and results in improved tone of both the skin and muscles. Many people have found that when various circumstances arise and only cold water is available to bathe in, after a month of cold water use they routinely report a change from their typically dry, flaky skin to extremely soft, radiant, smooth, naturally moist (but not oily), healthy skin.

Another benefit is that cold water makes your blood vessels constrict which reduces swelling and the appearance of dark circles under your eyes (where skin is at its thinnest). This provides you with a young, healthy glow.

Healthier Hair

The exact same damage that occurs to your skin in a hot shower also happens to your hair. Hot water dries out your hair stripping it of it’s natural healthy oils

Cold water will keep your hair looking healthier and shinier. As a matter of fact, cool air makes your hair shinier too (that’s why there is a cool air button on your hair dryer). Cold water does keeps your hair cuticles closed which makes the hair stronger and prevents dirt from easily accumulating within your scalp. Basically, the same principle with how it closes the pores of your skin as mentioned above. Stronger hair, of course, prevents hair from being easily pulled out when you are combing, and it helps in slowing down overall hair loss.

Cold showers are one of the great antiaging secrets for keeping your skin tight, elastic, vibrant, and radiant looking. All of this makes cold water therapy one of the top factors of longevity.

Cool Showers are Good, But a Healthy Cold Shock is Where the Real Magic Happens

A cool shower is clearly better than a hot shower, but flipping the dial all the way to the cold and getting blasted with an icy shock for the final 2 minutes of your shower is where the benefits come out. It will get your heart pumping and the blood flowing, shaking off any lethargy, and will leave you feeling invigorated and energized with an energy that can last several hours. Studies show that cold water therapy may have promise for those with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Immunity

The underlying premise of cold water therapy is that briefly and somewhat regularly exposing the body to certain kinds of natural stresses such as cold water can enhance health. Promoters of cold water therapy say that it can boost immune function, decrease inflammation and pain, and increase blood flow. You’ll find athletes today taking ice baths to speed their recovery from injuries and intense workouts.

Acute cold exposure has immunostimulating effects, and preheating with physical exercise or a warm shower can enhance this response. Increases in levels of circulating norepinephrine may account for this. Those who take ice baths show an enhanced long-term antioxidative adaptation as measured by several blood markers. Other research highlighting cold water’s effect on immunity shows an increase in both the number and activity of peripheral cytotoxic T lymphocytes in those regularly exposed to cold therapies. Full body cold water immersion and cryotherapy (cold air chamber) also resulted in a sustained increase in norepinephrine, which substantiates the long-term pain relief touted by cold therapy promoters. There’s even evidence it can help chronic heart failure, and some (non-lymphoid) types of cancers.

It’s all about upregulating our systems, taxing them in a healthy, natural way. 10 minutes seems to be the rough amount of time before a cold shower actually begins to become stressful on your body, so there’s no need to stay in a cold shower for more than a few minutes.

Improves Circulation

Cold showers increase blood circulation which helps flush out toxins everywhere in the body and is especially beneficial for the muscles and surface of the skin.

Upon waking from a full nights sleep the majority of your blood has flowed into the deeper parts of your body such as the internal organs to help them regenerate. To be active, alert and productive during the day you need a good portion of this blood to flow back into the peripheral extremities of your body. Tea or coffee in the mornings provides this for some people but it has negative consequences after long term use of the caffeine (most notably adrenal fatigue from the constant damaging stimulation).

When hot water hits your skin your body has the feeling of still being wrapped in the warm blanket it had around it when it was in bed just moments ago. The blood stays in the deeper parts of your body giving you a tired and lethargic feeling. When cold water hits your skin, capillaries near the surface dilate, which pulls blood out from the deeper parts of your body into the extremities to warm them up. After a certain amount of exposure to the cold shower they will contract and the blood flows back into the deeper parts of your body after having been cleansed.

Alternating between hot and cold water while you shower is an easy way to improve your circulation. (This is called a contrast bath and also has many benefits.) Cold water causes your blood to move to your organs to keep them warm. Warm water reverses the effect by causing the blood to move towards the surface of the skin. Cold shower proponents argue that stimulating the circulatory system in this way keeps them healthier and younger looking than their hot water-loving counterparts.

Depression

Cold showers have also been scientifically proven as an effective treatment for depression. Tests have showed that cold hydrotherapy can relieve depressive symptoms, significantly relieve pain, and result in improved quality of sleep. Best of all it does not have side effects or cause dependence. It’s truly a marvelous natural non-addictive anti-depressant!

One reason depression has been rising so drastically in wealthier countries is because our modern lifestyles keep us indoors under fairly consistently temperate conditions. Modern man rarely faces significant changes in body temperature during their day to day activities. Lacking certain physiological stressors such as brief changes in body temperature results in a lack of “thermal exercise” which may cause inadequate functioning of the brain.

Exposure to cold is known to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase the blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline. It also increases synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well. Here’s why the increase in these chemicals is so exciting.

Beta-endorphin is the neurotransmitter responsible for making us feel better immediately after an injury. It works by binding to and activating opioid receptors, dulling pain, and increasing feelings of relaxation and well-being. It even slows the growth of cancer cells, and is believed to play a role in correcting behavioral patterns such as stress, alcoholism, obesity, diabetes, and psychiatric illness.

Noradrenaline is a hormone and neurotransmitter useful for treating attention deficit disorder, depression, and abnormally low blood pressure. Some antidepressants function partly by increasing noradrenaline levels while most ADD medications often work solely by increasing noradrenaline levels.

Furthermore, due to the high density of cold receptors in the skin, a cold shower is expected to send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect making cold showers a great mood booster that will balance the autonomic nervous system helping you feel relaxed and peaceful, yet still alert and physically invigorated when you get out of the shower. And contrary to drugs that affect brain chemicals, cold showers do not have side effects or addictive potential.

Fat Loss

Exposure to cold could also increase your overall metabolic rate as your body may need to burn calories in order to produce warmth. It’s also possible that the sudden exposure to cold can raise your blood glucose very quickly, thereby having an appetite suppressing effect.

Cold water adaptation also builds up brown fat cells (as opposed to white fat) which have a large concentration of mitochondria that can generate heat without physical contraction or muscular movements. Brown fat cells protect us from aging, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Ray Cronis, a NASA scientist, was able to lose almost 30 pounds of fat (fat, not weight) in 6 weeks, by taking cold walks, cold swims, and by drinking cold water. Why? Because the body needs fuel to keep warm. This cold thermal loading may be a significant missing link in accelerating fat loss.

Stay Warmer

Although it seems counter intuitive, in the winter, cold showers are the best thing to keep you warm for the rest of the day. Cold showers provide a gentle form of stress that leads to thermogenesis (internal generation of body heat).

About a minute after flipping the water dial to full cold and being shocked awake, you’ll find the cold water starts to become more tolerable, and after 2 or 3 minutes you’ll feel your body getting warm by its own efforts. This is thermogenesis and it turns on the body’s adaptive repair systems to strengthen immunity, enhance pain and stress tolerance, ward off depression, overcome chronic fatigue syndrome, and stimulate anti-tumor responses.

Regular use of cold shower reduces heat losses and decreases core body temperature. Russian health nuts are obsessed with obtaining a lower body temperature due to a wide-spread belief that just one degree reduction in core body temperature extends expected life span of humans by some decades.

So endure the cold water until it starts to feel warm and be sure to exit the shower and enter a warm room where you can quickly towel off.

Testosterone

The same preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus that regulates thermogenesis also contains most GnRH (Gonadotropin-releasing hormone)-releasing neurons, making it a primary site of GnRH production. GnRH is responsible for the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the anterior pituitary gland which is hugely significant in stimulating testosterone production.

Increasing testosterone levels with 10 minute cold showers upon waking and before bed will not only boost a man’s libido, but also his overall strength and energy level.

Real benefit is in the habit

A cold shower has plenty of immediate benefits and provides a definite wake-up jolt, but the greatest benefits in long term health are only seen after several weeks of cold showering. Studies confirm that habituation itself is what is most beneficial.

The initial intense discomfort of cold water shock rapidly decreases in both intensity and duration with habituation and water (50F) appears to be more effective than just cool water (59F) in promoting adaptation. Typically, acclimatization to cold develops over the course of about 10 days, and in humans the primary change is an insulative, hypothermic type of response. But with more sustained exposure to cold air or water, humans can apparently develop the humoral type of acclimatization described in small mammals, with an increased output of noradrenaline and thyroxine. Adaptation to cold leads to increased output of the beneficial “short term stress” hormones adrenaline and thyroxine, leading to mobilization of fatty acids, and substantial fat loss over a 1-2 week period.

Situations to Avoid Cold Showers

Like anything, there is a proper time and place for cold showers, and also a time to avoid them. If showering immediately after a vigorous workout you may want to start hot and finish cold to avoid muscle cramping. Icy showers should probably not be done at all by menstruating or pregnant women as their body is already under a lot of stress at this time.

For most people though, making a daily habit of cold showering has many amazing proven benefits and will undoubtedly boost your entire immune system. It can be so effective that some people even report not having any colds since starting cold showers.

This perhaps leads into a greater question…since the gentle natural stress of a cold bath is so beneficial, could more aggressive exposure to the cold provide benefits that go beyond that of daily cold showers?

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33 Comments

  1. […] Yep, that’s right. Taking a cold showers has been scientifically proven to enhance male testosterone levels. It might sound hard to do (especially during the winter and fall) but if you can brace through 10 minutes of pain, over time your body’s t-levels can increase. In addition to higher t-levels, cold showers are good for your hair, skin, and immune system! ( Read More here ) […]

  2. mell says:

    Incredible information my friend! Incredible!

  3. […] Yep, that’s right. Taking cold showers has been scientifically proven to enhance male testosterone levels. It might sound hard to do (especially during the winter and fall) but if you can brace through 10 minutes of pain, over time your body’s t-levels can increase. In addition to higher t-levels, cold showers are good for your hair, skin, and immune system! ( Read More here ) […]

  4. […] into my third month of having cold showers or cold baths only for a week, which also offers some health benefits. I’m already quite comfortable with cold water now and will slowly introduce more hardship […]

  5. Siti Mazni says:

    I often suffer fro migraines and would take a hot shower and paracetamol to relieve the pain. Recently, I discovered that I felt much better after taking a cold shower. I enjoy the fast relief that it gives. I wonder why…..

  6. […] blood chilling Ice Shower to push the blood into our muscles at a spine chilling rate and boost our sympathetic nervous system . Emma is hard-core and hits the shower button and stands under the icy deluge, I’m a tad […]

  7. […] convince me otherwise. 4)    It’s healthy Cold showers have some great health effects, such as relieving depression, improving blood circulation, and keeping skin and hair healthy. Also, according to a study done in […]

  8. johnny says:

    I’ve been having (shortish <2mins) cold showers after a hot shower for over 35 years I am 52, and (apparently) look 10 years younger, and have recovered completely from a severe demyelinating neuropathy (which was caused by an auto-immune over reaction to a bacterial infection from a kitten bite!) as well as ‘beating’ Hep C, and several severe infections, including viral meningitis when I was maybe 22yo. The ‘neuropathy” aka a ‘Guillian-Barre’ disease/syndrome, from which I ‘lost’ almost 90% of my feeling and function in both arms and both legs, which were completely without ‘feeling’ (except an extraordinary level of constant ‘pain/hypersensation’ like when your arm wakes up from being ‘asleep’ and I couldn’t use them…after 1 year, after an EMG I was told “you have made a 5% recovery…we think it will take another 4-6 years and we can’t ‘promise you’ more than a 60% recovery!!) I have NO doubt the cold showers and my diet, have been 2 very important aspects of my ‘ability’ to recover from injury and illness and my overall ‘wellbeing’ Cold showers ROCK!!!

  9. johnny says:

    I forgo to include the FACT I am now about 98% ‘recovered’ from the neuropathy, and only have the odd sensation in my feet, but other than that I am feeling great

    I also ride a bicycle around as often as possible, usually at least a couple of kms per day rather than drive, which has had profound effects with my cardio and aerobic fitness levels

    I dont ride like I’m racing, but I try to ‘push myself’ somewhat (as ‘hard’ as I feel comfortable doing that ride, every day is different) and now after 15 months regular riding, I can go a few kms without hardly raising a sweat!~ which I could not have even done slowly 1 year ago

    You ARE what you eat, and breathing IS your ‘connection with Life!

    One can go without food for weeks, water for days , but only a few minutes without air before everything begins to go pear shaped!

    And the 2 things you can ‘give away, and never lose’ .. are , ‘what you know, and how you feel’ … and it ‘feels’ great when you do so to another persons benefit

    The only failure, is the failure to try

    • Taylor says:

      I love the post, but i have to mention one thing, i recently stopped riding my bike because i found out that it damages the prostate and can lead to prostate problems and ED(also damages female parts to) they sell seats to prevent damage but it still doesnt prevent 100% . I used to ride but not anymore. instead i swim, do walks/runs, or an at home cardio deal, i just try to do a cardio acvivity everyday or every other,, but i would research it though cause there is a lot of stuff most people dont know( including me when i found out) about the damage of bike riding

      also i heard walking barefeet on dirt or soil is great for you!! look up “earthing” or something about benifits of going barefoot,,(wanted to add that for you and everyone reading the comments) I have been looking up things that early humans did to see if i should do, and most everything comes out healthy ex. we are naturaly protected from sunburn but the soap in stores takes away good oils and we get burned.. i basically just try to think of things early humans did that we dont do anymore, you will find out some cool stuff! Peace!

  10. johnny says:

    p.s it took 6 years before I could again play, the simplest chord I knew on a guitar, nows I play better than ever…and it took 10 years before I could ‘trip, and not fall over’

    That day, when I tripped, and my reflexes stopped me from going down, was a landmark day in my recovery!

    It took another 8 years before 95% of my neuropathically related symptoms (pain, bad cramps/spasms, overall discomfort) subsided, and as I write this, I am SO grateful they have.

    After being ‘seen’ by numerous drs/specialists during the first 2 years, about 70% of the drs I saw had said to me things along the lines of “John, your nerves are SO damaged, you shouldn’t be feeling anything!

    I had to ‘challenge’ the Pharmacy Board Of Oz in the Magistrates court, becoz of these drs, primarily due to the Head Neurosurgeon, of one of my countries leading ‘teaching hospitals’, who also was the ‘Head Professor of neurology’ at the associated university!
    Who mis-diagnoseded me with, ‘hysterical paralysis’ (FFS!) and sent me home after I had ‘presented’ to his ‘clinic’, to which I had been referred, (after having attended the hospitals ER 5 days running, getting progressively worse)

    Yet after I had been carried in by 2 friends, and I clearly had “bi-lateral foot drop” which is a dead giveaway that ‘something may be seriously wrong’ he sent me home telling me “if you still have a problem in a week, come back and make another appt!)

    I was in that hospital <48hrs later, nearly dead! If not for a ER specialist friend, whom I had seen a few days before and explained my problem to, who I reached at home the next night, who saw me and had me admitted to hospital where I remained for the next 10 weeks. I lost 22kgs in the first 3 weeks, which took over 15 years to return..I was not at all fat, and after that I had virtually no muscle mass left!

    And that was the beginning of an experience I wouldn't wish on anyone, regardless of how much I may dislike them!

    At the 4 year mark of this recovery, I was so 'upset and disillusioned' by how I was/not that I tried to commit suicide with a massive overdose of several potent drugs (analgesics and benzodiazepines) I was being given to 'help' deal with my 'discomfort'

    Clearly I didn't die, and woke up 4 days later, extremely depressed. This was back in the 90's before fMRI's had shown that people like me were indeed in 'pain'

    And supported by a couple of drs, who DID 'believe me' when I complained of major neuropathic pain, we had to ask the court to 'overrule' these bloody pharmacists and let my drs get on with treating me. It was a truly fucked up situation, which nearly killed me)!
    Just for them to be able to provide, 'adequate analgesia' for me, to me!

    All this in Australia … A truly wonderful country, which I love dearly, except for the old anachronistic establishment cronies, who are still peppered throughout most professions, stifling the 'new ways' of their younger colleagues, becoz, 'these ways, are not 'the way' of what these dinosaurs 'think' they know!'

  11. varsha says:

    Thanks a lot for such an useful information….:) great info

  12. Marie says:

    I can’t believe how effective cold therapy has been for me. I could hardly get out of bed this morning because of some stress in my life as well as depression, but when I finally managed to get into the shower I decided to turn the knob from warm to cold. The jolt did it. I felt 100% better; it was an amazing awakening! My father used to tell us that his father made him and his brother take cold showers at 6 AM every day back in my native “tropical” country. That was probably a century ago! My siblings and I thought this was a cruel and inhuman thing that our dad must have gone through. I only recently started to practice it myself and wish that my kids and friends would do the same. Just reading Clay’s description of the benefits of a cold shower made me shiver at my desk. It’s like the jolt that I experienced earlier this morning hit me again!

    Thank you, Clay.

  13. Clare Cassidy says:

    This information was great – I learned a lot. I was checking about pregnant women taking cold showers and if it would damage the baby or not. I have been having cold showers now for a couple of weeks (I am 20 weeks pregnant) and I still have terrible morning sickness – I am finding that cold showers take the sickness feeling away by somehow putting my body into shock! After I eat something I feel sick straight away – so I jump in the shower and turn it between hot and cold – then end up with it cold..

    It has helped a lot (although I wish the sickness feeling would just disappear altogether)..

    Thank you very much,

    Clare.

  14. Inderjit S Gill says:

    Cold Shower Benefits
    In year 1997, I was 35 then living in Australia. Suddenly I start feeling pain in my both knees. I visited local doctor for its treatment. The Doctor checked my symptoms and gave me medications to take & joint pain relief cream to rub. As I started treatment, I didn’t feel any relief and the pain was increasing day by day. The doctor, changed my medication and changed joint pain relief cream too; but I didn’t feel any relief and the pain was worsening day to day. I was even, unable to walk & my doctor refereed me to a specialist. The specialist performed many tests, & started new treatment but my symptoms were not improving. I was unable to walk & stopped to go to work. I was under too much worry and my treating doctors too because I was not old person & was young man. One day a specialist was discussing with me very deeply and asked me a question whether any moment; I feel a little bit relief, any time? I replied yes that once it happened a few weeks before when I was able to walk and I went to a beach with my friends.
    I was resting on my bed and was thinking about this question that really I felt some relief on that day, when I spent some time in the water on the beach on that day. I was puzzled that why I felt pain relief on that day even I do shower every day in my bathroom and my pain is going up every day. I was thinking again and again on this issue that what is the difference between taking shower in the bathroom and on the beach? Both they are waters! Suddenly I thought the difference is: the water is hot in the bathroom and the water is cold on the beach.
    Could be; hot water is not making this trouble? From that day I decided to take shower in cold water instead hot water and within couple days my pains finished and I stopped all medications and started walking normally. After a month just for checking; I start using hot water again: the pains came back again. From that day I never used hot water for shower and I never felt pains in my life up to today. I wrote this article because: if anyone can try this formula and get pain relief. I don’t think anyone get relief using cold water instead hot water but if one hindered persons try this formula and couple persons, getting relief then it would be great if someone goes off medications and can save in gas bill too.
    With thanks
    Inderjit S Gill

  15. Dini says:

    Is really amazing ” Clay “for your tip

  16. OLUSSY says:

    i have been having a cold shower for almost a year now and i ve seen no changes on my skin because it is still as dry as anything else. What do i need to do?

    • Clay says:

      You might try getting a $30 shower filter to help remove chlorine from the water. My family experienced immediate improvements in dry skin and I’ve read many other people claim the same thing. Worth a try!

  17. TheTruth says:

    The concentrations of testosterone (TS) and other related hormones in serum were examined before and after physical exercise with a bicycle ergometer (90 Watts, 20 min.) and a cold water stimulation in 32 19-year-old males. While exercising, the serum TS level significantly increased by 20.8% (p less than 0.05), the luteinizing hormone (LH) level by 3.6% (p less than 0.05) and noradrenaline (NA) level by 140.0% (p less than 0.01). During cold water stimulation, TS decreased by 10.0%, LH increased by 22.1% and NA decreased by 23.8%. Based on changes in hormone levels within the individual during the loads. there was a significant positive correlation coefficient (r) between TS and LH, and between TS and NA, with r (TS-LH) = 0.399 (p less than 0.05) and r (TS-NA) = 0.481 (p less than 0.05) for physical exercise, while r (TS-LH) = 0.403 (p less than 0.05) and r (TS-NA) = 0.431 (p less than 0.05) for cold water stimulation, respectively. These results suggest that physical exercise increases TS level in serum by increasing LH and NA levels, but these tendencies were not found with cold water stimulation.

    http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/1890772

  18. mavia says:

    Thanks… for this incredible information,,,

  19. Eugenia says:

    Cold showers have so many benefits. I am mad that pregnant women and women while menstruating cannot take cold showers.

  20. mry says:

    Ok… But one thing I don’t understand. If this is sooooo beneficial how come our bodies do not generate all those miraculous effects on their own and require such a form of shock? There has to be some kind of detrimental side effect for taking those showers (acceleated aging, for example?)…. Otherwise evolution would provide us with this effect on its own.

    • Andrew says:

      But Mry, that’s like saying there has to be some detrimental side effect to deriving vitamins from eating fruits/vegetables because “Otherwise evolution would provide us with this effect on its own.” It’s not a meaningful criticism.

  21. […] was shortly after I told her I was taking only cold showers to thermogenically boost my metabolism and calorie burning. The first couple of showers were awful and the cold water was shocking. So […]

  22. Gabe says:

    This is fascinating stuff, and I’d love to find out its all true. But, If your going to term drop like your somebody, then you better start citing your sources. “Tests have shown”, “promoters say” “scientifically proven”–all relevant phrases if accompanied by a source. So please do us a favor, and put some bones in this meat.

  23. […] stres, zapobiega i przeciwdziała depresji , łagodzi i zwalcza syndrom przewlekłego zmęczenia, zatrzymuje wypadanie włosów oraz stymuluje odpowiedź […]

  24. Sophie says:

    So much bullshit science in this. Anyone with a scientific degree could rip this to shreds

  25. […] There are a number of forms of cold-water therapy…and they don’t just promote overall wellness. Tests demonstrate that when you skip the hot-cold switches and immerse in a tub or shower at 10-15 degrees C (50-59 degrees F) for about 24 minutes, you gain all sorts of other health benefits. For starters: […]

  26. Milan says:

    Hello and thank you for this article.
    I am a 44 yo healthy male and I started doing cold showers every day three weeks ago with great success and immediate well-being effects. I first do a regular lukewarm shower and then turn to completely cold water. In my household, temperature of cold water is 18 C, so not quite a swim in a frozen lake. I started with 1 minute of cold water in the end and extended by minute every week.
    Last week, however, I began noticing that the feeling of energy and well-being waned off and did not appear anymore after cold showers. Instead, I began feeling down and drowsy afterwards, with hands and feet feeling cold for hours. Also my intolerance of outside cold seems to have increased. Although I have developed resistance to cold shower, it just doesn’t feel right anymore. What could be the reason for this sudden change? Thank you in advance for your opinions.

  27. […] Keep in mind that it is important to talk to your doctor before assuming that a hot or cold shower will resolve health issues.  All the information in this post has been found from the following sources:  fitsugar.com, hubpages.com and here, livestrong.com, impossiblehq.com, ineedmotivation.com, howstuffworks.com, lifehack.org, artofmanliness.com, and betterbodyguide.com. […]

  28. […] back up this random comment. And found TONS of articles supporting not only the idea that cold showers before bed help you sleep, but that they can help depression, your immune response, and […]

  29. Hamish says:

    I’ve been doing them for three weeks and seen massive improvement in everything. But the biggest area was my mood, because I have epilepsy and the medication has a negative affect and made me not the happiest a lot of the times side affects but since I’ve been doing them I’m more then happy, alert and energetic.
    All that info is more then correct :)